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19 posts about #ruby

to install ruby 2.4.6 on a Mac m1 with rbenv

Once upon a time (even thouhg we have newer versions of ruby) I had to install an older version of ruby, the 2.4.6 on my Mac M1 (OS X 12.6), I was having this problem:

ruby-build: using readline from homebrew

BUILD FAILED (macOS 12.6 using ruby-build 20220910.1)

So after googling I found that we can do this:

CFLAGS="-Wno-error=implicit-function-declaration" RUBY_CONFIGURE_OPTS='--with-readline-dir=/usr/local/opt/readline/' arch -x86_64 rbenv install 2.4.6

and it worked!

that's it bye!

Learned by victor-delarocha on Sep 27, 2022

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Always use retry inside rescue blocks

Ruby includes a retry keyword that would bring execution back to the start of the current method while preserving scope. But what if you do this?

def my_method
  my_var = 1
  retry
end

That would fail with an Invalid retry, which is one of the few illegal statements in Ruby.

retry is only allowed inside rescue blocks.

def my_method
  my_var = 1
  raise Exception
rescue Exception
  retry
end

Learned by kevin-perez on Aug 16, 2022

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Defining classes using full name vs wrapping them inside modules

In Ruby, we can write classes inside modules. We usually do this to have classes namespaced to the module, so we don't risk two different classes having the same name. This is important since Ruby won't complain about re-defining a class, it would just open it and add new methods to it.

We could write classes using their full name, like this:

class Pokemon::Game::SpecialAttack < Pokemon::Game::Attack
  # ...
end

or, we could wrap the whole thing using modules, like this:

module Pokemon
  module Game
    class SpecialAttack < Attack # Ruby looks for SpecialAttack inside Pokemon::Game automatically!
      # ...
    end
  end
end

Both methods work the same, except the one above can only reference Attack using its whole name. On the other hand, it looks somewhat easier to read than nesting modules inside other modules. Which style do you prefer?

Learned by kevin-perez on Mar 4, 2022

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Spaceship Operator <=>

The spaceship operator compares two objects (from left to right), returning either -1, 0, or 1.

Explanation

a <=> b

return -1 if a < b
return 0 if a == b
return 1 if a > b
4 <=> 7 # -1
7 <=> 7 # 0
7 <=> 4 # 1

Example one

As you know, in ruby (as in any language) we can get a result in different ways, we could use just the sort method, of course, but I just wanted to put this in another way:

languages = ['ruby', 'go', 'javascript', 'phyton', 'rust', 'elixir']

languages.sort{|first, second| first <=> second } # ["elixir", "go", "javascript", "phyton", "ruby", "rust"]

languages.sort{|first, second| second <=> first } # ["rust", "ruby", "phyton", "javascript", "go", "elixir"]

Example two

Suppose that we have the next array with the numbers 1 to 10, and we will like to separate them into different groups: 1. One group for the numbers that are less than 5 2. Another group with the number 5 3. The last group with the numbers that are greater than 5

We could get this result by iterating the array and then by putting a couple of if statements in order to group these 3 categories, but with the spaceship operation we could get this result in an easier way:

numbers = Array(1..10)
target = 5

numbers.group_by{ |number| number <=> target } # {-1=>[1, 2, 3, 4], 0=>[5], 1=>[6, 7, 8, 9, 10]}

Learned by samantha-bello on Nov 19, 2021

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Use 'super' and add custom arguments to a specific class

Sometimes we want to create a parent class that will be shared for children classes, nevertheless, in some of the children classes we need additional arguments that will be only specific for that class and we don't need them in the parent class, to avoid adding additional arguments that won't be relevant to the parent class, we can do the next:

class ParentClass
  attr_reader :user

  def initialize(user)
    @user = user
  end
end
class ChildOne < ParentClass
  attr_reader :token

  def initialize(user, token)
    super(user)
    @token = token
  end
end

This way the new variable token will be available only for the ChildOne class.

Learned by samantha-bello on Nov 12, 2021

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Constant resolution operator `::`

Also, known as scope resolution operator.

When we work with namespace it's very common to override some objects, etc that we already have. This could cause us headaches when we try to access a specific object and that object has the same name as our namespace. To have a clearer idea, let's review the next example, imagine that we have the next nested modules:

module FHIR
  module Services
    module Appointment
      def appointment
        @appointment ||= Appointment.find(id)
      end
    end
  end
end

If you do Appointment.find(id) you will get an error similar to this: NoMethodError: undefined method 'find' for FHIR::Services::Appointment:Module.

That ^ is because the Appointment is doing reference to the namespace FHIR::Services::Appointment (local scope) instead of the Appointment model (global scope).

The constant resolution operator will help us to resolve this. If you put:

::Appointment.find(id)

This will work because is referencing the global namespace which is the Appointment model this way you can access directly to the model instead of the current namespace.

Learned by samantha-bello on Nov 5, 2021

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module_function

What it does?

  • module_function allows exposing instance’s methods so they can be called as they would be class methods.
module User
  def name
    'Hello Sam'
  end
end

If you try to do this:

user = User.new
user.name

You're gonna receive an error because modules do not respond to the new method.

How can we use it?

You can use this useful method module_function:

module User
  module_function

  def name
    'Hello Sam'
  end
end

And call the name method like User.name

  1. Use module_function to use all the methods inside a module as class methods or
  2. Use module_function :name to only apply it in a specific method

A second option to do it

Another option to do so is using extend self instead:

module User
  extend self

  def name
    'Hello Sam'
  end
end

Learned by samantha-bello on Sep 29, 2021

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Typeprof Ruby Interpreter in Ruby 3.0+

TypeProf is a Ruby interpreter that abstractly executes Ruby programs at the type level. It executes a given program and observes what types are passed to and returned from methods and what types are assigned to instance variables. All values are, in principle, abstracted to the class to which the object belongs, not the object itself.

Example: 1

 $ typeprof user.rb
# TypeProf 0.12.0

# Classes
class User
  attr_accessor skip_add_role: untyped
  def self.from_omniauth: (?Hash[bot, bot] auth) -> User

  private
  def assign_default_role: -> nil
end

Example 2:

 $ typeprof skill.rb
# TypeProf 0.12.0

# Classes
class Skill
  private
  def acceptable_image: -> nil
end

Example 3:

 $ typeprof ability.rb
# TypeProf 0.12.0

# Classes
class Ability
  attr_accessor user: untyped
  def initialize: (untyped user) -> untyped

  private
  def alias_actions: -> untyped
  def register_extension_abilities: -> untyped
end

Learned by Victor Velazquez on Aug 13, 2021

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Safe access for nested key values in a Hash - dig method

If you are using Ruby 2.3.0 or above

Now instead of doing this:

result.try(:[], 'avatar').try(:[], 'model').try(:[], 'raw_attributes').try(:[], 'signup_state')
# or
result && result['avatar'] && result['avatar']['model'] && result['avatar']['model']['raw_attributes'] && result['avatar']['model']['raw_attributes']['signup_state']

Now you can easily do the same with dig:

result.dig('avatar', 'model', 'raw_attributes', 'signup_state')

Learned by heriberto-perez on Apr 28, 2021

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use bundle open gemname

You can take a peek at a locally installed gem's code very easily in ruby mine.
If you are using another IDE it would require a few extra steps:
First, set BUNDLER_EDITOR in ~/.bashrc or ~/.zshrc (or whatever shell you are using)
export BUNDLER_EDITOR="code"
(code to use VS code)
Then, simply run $ bundle open gemname and voilá! Look at whatever gem you want

Learned by Eduardo Gutiérrez on Apr 6, 2021

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Ruby 2.7 introduced numbered parameters for blocks

Since Ruby 2.7, it is possible to use numbered parameters in blocks additionally to named parameters.

This is an example of a block with named parameters:

my_array.each { |element| element.do_something }

And this is the same line with numbered parameters:

my_array.each { _1.do_something }

This works with multiple parameters too:

# named parameters
my_hash.each_pair { |key, value| puts "#{key}: #{value}" }

# numered parameters
my_hash.each_pair { puts "#{_1}: #{_2}" }

Learned by kevin-perez on Mar 30, 2021

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Creating an infinite loop in Ruby

If you need to iterate over a collection that its size is unknown, you can create an infinite loops in ruby easily, but if you need an index, then there's this option:

(1..).each do |page|
  results = ExternalService.get('/endpoint', page: page)
  parsed = JSON.parse(response.body)
  break if parsed['data'].empty?

  process_data(parsed['data'])
end

Learned by Edwin Cruz on Mar 16, 2021

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More about randomness

If you want to generate random but predictable sequences of numbers, then the rand command and the srand are not enough, you have to use a trick to save the state of the variable. Fibers are primitives for implementing light weight cooperative concurrency in Ruby. Basically they are a means of creating code blocks that can be paused and resumed, much like threads. The main difference is that they are never preempted and that the scheduling must be done by the programmer and not the VM.

require 'rspec'

#i = pseudo_random 10
#p i.resume => 37
#p i.resume => 12
#p i.resume => 72
#
def pseudo_random num
  srand 1

  fiber = Fiber.new do
    num.times do
      Fiber.yield rand 100
    end
  end
end


describe 'Pseudo Random number generator' do
  it 'creates the same sequence of random numbers' do
    random_sequence = pseudo_random 3
    expect(random_sequence.resume).to eq(37)
    expect(random_sequence.resume).to eq(12)
    expect(random_sequence.resume).to eq(72)
  end
end

Learned by enrique-meza on Mar 10, 2021

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Quasi-Random numbers in Ruby

I was interested in random sequence because I was in need to test the Montecarlo Method for getting Pi digits.

One method to estimate the value of π (3.141592…) is by using a Monte Carlo method. This method consists of drawing on a canvas a square with an inner circle. We then generate a large number of random points within the square and count how many fall in the enclosed circle. Pi

So, if you need a random sequence, you can use Sobol for quasi-random numbers.


require 'gsl'

q = GSL::QRng.alloc(GSL::QRng::SOBOL, 2)
v = GSL::Vector.alloc(2)
for i in 0..1024 do
  q.get(v)
  printf("%.5f %.5f\n", v[0], v[1])
end

Learned by enrique-meza on Mar 10, 2021

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The slice_when method in Ruby

Creates an enumerator for each chunked elements. The beginnings of chunks are defined by the block.

This method splits each chunk using adjacent elements, elt_before, and elt_after, in the receiver enumerator. This method split chunks between elt_before and elt_after where the block returns true.

The block is called the length of the receiver enumerator minus one.

The result enumerator yields the chunked elements as an array. So each method can be called as follows:

enum.slice_when { |elt_before, elt_after| bool }.each { |ary| ... }

For example:

Return adjacent elements from this array [1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 9, 10] in chunked elements as an array.

[1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 9, 10].slice_when {|i, j| i+1 != j }.to_a
=> [[1, 2, 3], [5, 6], [9, 10]]

Learned by Victor Velazquez on Mar 5, 2021

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The each_cons method in Ruby

Iterates the given block for each array of consecutive <n> elements. If no block is given, returns an enumerator.

irb(main):001:0> [1,2,3,4].each_cons(2).to_a
=> [[1, 2], [2, 3], [3, 4]]

irb(main):002:0> [1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 9, 10].each_cons(2).to_a
=> [[1, 2], [2, 3], [3, 5], [5, 6], [6, 9], [9, 10]]

Print any two adjacent words in a given text:

def print_adjacent_words(phrase)
   phrase.split.each_cons(2) do |words|
     puts adjacent_word = words.join(" ")
   end
end
irb(main):025:0> print_adjacent_words("Hello Darkness my old friend")
Hello Darkness
Darkness my
my old
old friend
=> nil

Learned by Victor Velazquez on Mar 5, 2021

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Ruby Double star (**)

def hello(a, *b, **c)
  return a, b, c
end

a is a regular parameter. *b will take all the parameters passed after the first one and put them in an array. **c will take any parameter given in the format key: value at the end of the method call.

See the following examples:

One parameter

hello(1)
# => [1, [], {}]

More than one parameter

hello(1, 2, 3, 4)
# => [1, [2, 3, 4], {}]

More than one parameter + hash-style parameters

hello(1, 2, 3, 4, a: 1, b: 2)
# => [1, [2, 3, 4], {:a=>1, :b=>2}]

Learned by Victor Velazquez on Mar 4, 2021

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Measuring memory utilization

Ruby comes with the cool module Benchmark, but the only downside is that it only provides the time taken for each task.

A simple approach to get how many memory the ruby process is consuming is to call: ps -o rss:

memory_before = `ps -o rss= -p #{$$}`.to_i
Utils.heavy_memory_consumming_process
memory_after = `ps -o rss= -p #{$$}`.to_i

puts "The process took #{memory_after - memory_before} KB"

Learned by Edwin Cruz on Mar 1, 2021

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Connecting Ruby to AWS IoT Core using MQTT client

If you need to use Ruby to connect to Aws Iot Core, this is all you need:

require 'aws-sdk-iot'
require 'aws-sdk-secretsmanager'
require 'json'
require 'mqtt'

secrets_manager = Aws::SecretsManager::Client.new(
    region: ENV["IOT_AWS_REGION"],
    access_key_id: ENV["IOT_AWS_ACCESS_KEY"],
    secret_access_key: ENV["IOT_AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY"]
    )

client = Aws::IoT::Client.new(
    region: ENV["IOT_AWS_REGION"],
    access_key_id: ENV["IOT_AWS_ACCESS_KEY"],
    secret_access_key: ENV["IOT_AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY"]
    )

# Creates new ssl certificate
cert = client.create_keys_and_certificate(set_as_active: true)

# A policy named iot-mqtt needs to exist with permissions to publish and read
# any topic names
client.attach_policy(policy_name: "iot-mqtt", target: cert.certificate_arn)

# Stores the certificate in aws secrets manager
secrets_manager.create_secret(name: "iot_cert_pem", secret_string: cert.certificate_pem)
secrets_manager.create_secret(name: "iot_private_key", secret_string: cert.key_pair.private_key)

# Reads the certificate from aws secrets manager
cert_pem = secrets_manager.get_secret_value(secret_id: "iot_cert_pem").secret_string
private_key = secrets_manager.get_secret_value(secret_id: "iot_private_key").secret_string

# Connects to aws iot core endpoint using mqtts
mqtt_client = MQTT::Client.new(ENV["IOT_AWS_ENDPOINT"])
mqtt_client.cert = cert_pem
mqtt_client.key = private_key
mqtt_client.connect(MQTT::Client.generate_client_id("my-awesome-app-"))

# Publishes a message
message = { desired: { speed_limit: 35 } }
mqtt_client.publish("$aws/things/sensor_home/shadow/update", { state: message }.to_json)

# Listens to all accepted shadow updates
mqtt_client.get("$aws/things/+/shadow/+/accepted") do |topic, message|
    payload = JSON.decode(message)
    puts "Got #{topic}"
    puts "With #{payload}"
end

Learned by Edwin Cruz on Feb 11, 2021

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